Archive | November, 2010

Winners and sur-Prizes!

22 Nov

Here’s how we got our win on here at diglibdig:

1) Posted with a call for a tenth contributor and an announcement that one of our first nine contributors would also win a prize.

2) Checked our email account obsessively regularly, hoping for a post from said tenth contributor.

3) Jumped with glee when Carrie Schmidt heeded the call with a post about food priorities while moving. Our first prize pack would travel all the way across the country to Vancouver, BC!

4) Drew names from an oven mitt to determine which of our first nine contributors would win the other prize pack. ‘Cause we librarians are all about rigour. No chef’s hat was to be found in Laura’s kitchen, so we made do with what we had.

Names for draw (and Laura's Price-is-Right hands)

Oven mitt with Price-is-Right hands

Jennifer's name drawn from the oven mitt

5) Thought it was fitting that Jennifer O’Donnell, who posted about the joy of soup when the cold weather first made its appearance, should be our second winner as winter closed in. Her prize pack would take a much shorter journey to Kingston, ON.

6) Assembled Montreal/Quebec goodies:

Carrie's prize pack

Carrie's prize pack

Jennifer's prize pack

Jennifer's prize pack

Maple Pepper
Olive oil chocolates
Sucre a la creme
Ginger Lime preserves / Red Pepper preserves
Maple syrup candy
Fleur de sel spoon (probably not from Quebec but so cute Lora couldn’t resist)
Salmon jerky from the salmon store on St. Laurent
Powdered poutine sauce from St. Hubert
Maple potato donuts / Chai tea

(yes, of course we bought extras and ate them)

6) Bundled up the prizes and shipped them off to our winners.

Prize parcels

7) Wished we could see the reactions of our winners upon receipt.

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Priorities

15 Nov

By Carrie Schmidt

It has been said that moving is one of those things that causes major stress. Divorce, the death of a loved one, moving – oh yes, and unemployment. THE major stressors, according to people who make lists and conduct studies and like to categorize something as nebulous as stress.

Boxes stuffed and stacked

I’ve moved house a few times: Edmonton to Banff, Banff to Vancouver, Vancouver to Edmonton, Edmonton to Calgary and back again, a few different locations in Edmonton, then off to Montreal (two different places in Montreal), Montreal to Vancouver…. I like to think I know a thing or two about packing prized objects and breakable things, and I’ve developed some very handy time management and negotiating skills along the way.

But planning ahead around moving time with regards to meals has been a black hole. My most recent move was within Vancouver, at the end of July, and we used a local moving company, as my fella and I have reached a stage in our lives where rounding up our friends and promising beer and pizza in exchange for heavy lifting is no longer an option. Hiring professionals is well worth the cash when it comes to certain things, and moving is one of those things.

Experts say to do the kitchen packing last, and for good reason – if your pots and pans and dishes and utensils are in boxes, how do you eat? And, if it’s a relatively short move, you also need to pack up whatever is left in your fridge, but you don’t really want to have a full fridge, so….. meal planning gets a little dicey around moving time. Not to mention coordinating with a cleaning schedule: I don’t want to clean the stove and the fridge and then have to deal with cleaning them again due to some sort of foolhardy food mishap.

I decided to treat the fridge like an art object – complete with curatorial photographs. A few days before moving, I removed all things moldy and rotting, and set aside a box where perishables could be transported to their new home.

Before cleaning:

Before fridge

After cleaning:

After fridge

The pristine condition of our now organized and somewhat attractive refrigerator proved to be intimidating; we didn’t really eat too much out of it before moving. We became reliant on fast food, sadly. If I had done a better job at not letting all that moving “stress” get to me, perhaps we would have been eating things more like this:

Delicious salad

instead of what we ended up eating (and regretting), due to not being 100% sure of where the grocery store is, but all-too-aware of those damn golden arches.

Disgusting burger

And in case you’re wondering about our nutritional priorities, this was the very first object that was unpacked – not just the first kitchen thing, but THE FIRST THING:

Coffee

Check out Carrie’s bio on the Contributors page.

Gratitude meets generosity (see also Prizes)

8 Nov

We’re feeling grateful over here at diglibdig. For the harvest, which nourishes. For our contributors, who inspire. For you, dear readers, who are our raison d’être.

And so, to bridge the seasons of gratitude and generosity, we’re offering some prizes: assorted Montreal delicacies that we’ll ship to our winners wherever they are.

St. Viateur Bagels

Hint-Hint, Nudge-Nudge

The first prize will go to our tenth contributor. We’re delighted that nine librarians have joined our feast so far and want to encourage more of you to do so. Here’s how to get in on the food-fueled fun – the first completed post (including pictures, suggested tags, a bio, etc.) sent to diglibdig@gmail.com wins!

We’ll also draw a name from a chef’s hat to show our gratitude to the first nine contributors who pulled up a chair and wrote for diglibdig. We hope you’ll join us at the table again sometime soon.

Share your information. Share your food.

  1. French phrase meaning “reason for existence.” It may also refer to: Raison dêtre (band), a Swedish dark-ambient-industrial-drone music
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Pumpkin pie perfection

3 Nov

Hello blogosphere!

My name is Alison, and I currently reside in Winnipeg. I don’t know how it feels where you are, but it is most certainly, undeniably fall here. And fall really makes me want to do three things:

1) knit

2) drink tea and

3) bake delicious, spicy, wholesome foods

Since this is a blog dedicated to yummy foods made by library folk, I have decided to share my first pumpkin pie baking experience.

It began with me heading to the Organic market; sadly, they didn’t have pumpkins yet, so this baby hails from Superstore.  I brought my orange baby home, and opened my laptop and went right to Martha Stewart’s web site. Regardless of how you may feel about her, one cannot deny the woman is a genius in the kitchen. I also feel her recipes are really easy to follow, and every one I have used has turned out super yum. I grabbed this recipe from her site.

I began poking several holes around my pumpkin, placing it in about an inch of water, and shoving it in the oven. 45 minutes later, I had a steamed pumpkin.

Steamed Pumpkin

Steamed Pumpkin

Next, I cut off the top, peeled off the skin and cut the pumpkin into small chunks. I then used my food processor to mash it up.  It made a LOT of pumpkin puree.  Enough for seven pies and at least two batches of pumpkin cookies (to be made on a later date).

Pumpkin Pieces

Pumpkin Pieces

For the crust, I elected to use the Press In recipe Martha suggested. It’s an easy shortbread crust and it’s super tasty. Though, don’t use a mixer. I tried on my first go (I know I shouldn’t have, I just really wanted to get the crust going) and it pretty much failed. It turned all gooey. The second go around was a lot more successful. The dough was pretty crumbly, which made me concerned that it would end up dry and sandy, but it didn’t. It ended up absorbing moisture from the pie filling.

Press In Shortbread Pie Crust

Press In Shortbread Pie Crust

Next, I began the pie filling. Om nom nom!  I threw together the pumpkin, heavy cream, sugar, vanilla, salt, cinnamon, ginger, allspice, and eggs in a large bowl and whisked it. After tasting it, I thought it needed more allspice and cinnamon.  I added twice as much.

Pumpkin Pie Filling

Pumpkin Pie Filling

Pre-Oven Pumpkin Pie

Pre-Oven Pumpkin Pie

I then stuck the pies in the oven for 60 mins. After pulling them out, I waited about an hour before I gave them a taste. They were pretty good, but the next day they were really good!

Pumpkin Pie Slice

Pumpkin Pie Slice

Overall, this was a very easy, yummy recipe.  My first attempt at pumpkin pie turned out a success! You should note, I made a double recipe, which made seven pies. There were six mighty happy people after I made this. 😉

Hopefully, you’ve enjoyed my post and as Julia would say, Bon appetit! 🙂

Alison Pattern

Check out Alison’s bio on the Contributors page.